The secret behind meaningful product roadmaps

I gave a talk recently about how I’ve been using data and analytics to guide my decisions in product management. I’ve edited the transcript a little and split it into bite-size parts for your entertainment. This final bit tells the secret behind meaningful product roadmaps. The previous bit was about the benefits of open and transparent data.

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Product roadmapping, prioritisation and portfolio management on Mind the Product

Mind the Product logo

For June’s ProductTank London, experts spoke on the topic of product roadmapping, prioritisation and portfolio management:

  • Michelle You (@wreckingball37), Co-founder and Chief Product Officer of Songkick
  • Janna Bastow (@simplybastow), Co-founder of ProdPad, and of Mind The Product
  • Lee Wilkinson (@ProdDev_LeeW), Director of Product at Hearst Magazine

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Back(log) to the Future – story arcs, roadmaps and product themes

Last time I published an article explaining why I thought roadmaps were a little like DVD box sets.   DonorDrive product manager Kasey Marcum (@kaseymarcum) asked in the comments:

“Always enjoy your posts, Jock! I really love the high level idea of this. What does this actually look like in the wild?”

Imagine your roadmap and sprints being as engaging as a hit movie – just think how much easier they’d be to “sell” to your stakeholders and customers!  Let’s see how you can do this.

Back to the Future

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36: Roadmaps are like DVD box sets

OpenStreetMap LondonI’m writing about one hundred things I’ve learned as a product manager.

Curating the product roadmap is one of the most typical responsibilities of a product manager.  But have you ever thought about why you bother with them in the first place and how you could make them more effective?

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11: You are allowed to say ‘no’ – it’s strategic

I’m writing about one hundred things I’ve learned as a product manager.

Product managers hate saying ‘no’. It’s not in our nature to disappoint people. We want everyone to be happy with our products. We’d much rather say a nice, cooperative ‘yes’ that makes everyone happy and leaves us feeling warm and fuzzy.

The problem is that saying yes to everything creates manifest chaos. Continue reading